Canvas Course Analytics and Quiz Statistics

Canvas offers instructors some incredibly powerful tools to view course analytics, individual student analytics and quiz statistics.

The wealth of information provides instructors with a comprehensive view of student engagement as well as insight into areas for improvement and redesign.

Course Analytics using New Analytics

Learning how to use Course Analytics in Canvas is essential to those Instructors primarily using Canvas to teach online. The information provided in New Analytics will guide instructors to better understand overall participation and engagement from their students. With New Anayltics, Canvas also offers the ability to recognize positive and negative trends to make improvements and adjustments to course quality; easily identifying those students who are struggling, problematic items or areas in your course that may need adjustment.

New Analytics provides:

  • Student Analytics using New Analytics

In Canvas the analytics shown for each student can give instructors valuable insight about engagement, activity, and performance. Canvas’ ability to view individual student analytics allows instructors to disemminate

For more detailed information review the Canvas guides for New Analytics and “How to view Course Analytics?”
Where to access New Analytics
New Analytics main screen

     

    Quiz Statistics

    Another feature provided to instrucors using quizzing in Canvas are quiz statistics. The feature is available to instructors when a quiz has been published and at least one submission has been recieved for the quiz. The quiz summary will show all score percentages as well as the quiz average score, high score, low score, standard deviation (how far the values are spread across the entire score range), and average time of quiz completion. Instructors can view and download a CSV file to view a Student Analysis or Item Analysis for each question in the quiz. 

    Available info from Quiz Statistics:

    1. Student/Item Analysis – Instructors caDownload CSV files to view Student Analysis or Item Analysis for each quiz question to count all student attempts in the statistics.
    2. Quiz Item Analysis – Item analysis may not generate results within specific quizzes. For more detailed information about item analysis limitations and calculations please refer to the Quiz Item Analysis PDF for detailed information about Reliability, Difficulty, and Item Discrimination Index.
    3. Question Summary – Instructors can view an entire quiz summary that shows all score percentages. The quiz summary also shows the quiz average score, high score, low score, standard deviation (how far the values are spread across the entire score range), and average time of quiz completion.
    4. Question Summary Chart – The quiz summary chart is interactive; users can focus on a specific segment of the chart by selecting a range with their cursor, such as viewing the number of students who scored between 0 and 50 percent. Scroll down the page to see data for each question in the quiz.
    5. Question Breakdown  – Quiz question shows the total percentage of students who answered the quiz question correctly. Each question includes a breakdown with each question answer choice.
    For more detailed information review the Canvas guide for “Once I publish a quiz, what kinds of quiz statistics are available?”

    To access Quiz Statistics, Click the “Quizzes” link in your Course Navigation menu, then click the title of the quiz you would like to open. On the right sidebar click “Quiz Statistics”. 

    Quiz Statistics Sample

    Listen to how Dr. Viji Sathy and Dr. Kelly Hogan, instructors at UNC – Chapel Hill are using the insight provided by their LMS to redesign courses for inclusion, encouraging student success while reducing achievement gaps. We hope this inspires you to explore the possibilities with our LMS by using New Analytics in Canvas when redesigning your course while applying Universal Design for Learning and inclusion best practices for all student success.

    How does this align to Canvas training materials?

    Canvas logoPriming the Canvas: 7.0 Module Overview: Universal Design for Learning

     


    Additional Resources:

    Visit Canvas Blog to see all our Canvas articles. 

    Rubrics in Canvas

    Rubrics can be used to grade assignments, discussions and quizzes in a course. 

    Rubrics can be used to as an efficient way to evaluate assignments, quizzes and discussions with more effective and valuable individual feedback and expectation for students. 

     

    Why You Should Consider Rubrics

    Rubrics help instructors:

    • Provide students with feedback that is straightforward, focused and central to learning improvement.
    • Reduce time spent on grading; Increase time spent on teaching.
    • Promote student comprehension of assignment instructions and expectations so they can easily discern what to focus on rather than guessing “what the teacher wants to see.”
    • Streamline evaluation of rubric results to make informed adjustments to course content and material based on identified thematic gaps in student learning across a class.
    • Refine consistency in evaluation of student learning throughout an entire class as well as individual students.

    Rubrics help students:

    • Sharpen their efforts on completing assignments and assessments that align with clearly defined expectations.
    • Self and Peer-reflection on their own learning to make informed adjustments and improvements to accomplish learning level and mastery.

     (Adapted from UC Berkely Center for Teaching & Learning – Evaluate Course-Level Learning – Rubrics)

    It is important to note that rubrics used in Blackboard may look different in Canvas depending on the criteria and settings. Review the information provided in the knowledge base article “Do my rubrics in Blackboard migrate to Canvas?” 

    How does this align to Canvas training materials?

    Canvas logoPriming the Canvas: Module 2: “Designing a Canvas Course” & Module 12 “Teaching in the Virtual Classroom”

     


    Additional Resources:

    Our next article will highlight Canvas Implementation Core Integrations visit Canvas Blog to see all our Canvas articles. 

    Discussions in Canvas

    The Canvas’ Discussions Feature – How does it Fare? 

    Of all Blackboard tools, the Blackboard Discussion Board may be the most utilized by instructors and students. Many faculty rely on the discussion board as a central aspect of their teaching and learning strategy, for icebreakers, the deep dive, and debates.  

    As we move towards Canvas, and away from Blackboard, what kinds of differences can we expect? Does Canvas’ discussions function the same? What implications do these differences have for our design and facilitation? 

    This post explores what faculty can and should prepare for, as it relates to this one central aspect of digital teaching. Let’s start with the functionality we can all expect to see. 

     

    Functionality Gained in Canvas 

    With Canvas, instructors can require peer review of discussion posts. 

    Instructors looking to assign students to small groups for student-to-student learning opportunities will appreciate this feature. 

    Instructors can easily view/filter posts within a discussion through a word search. 

    This may be useful if you need to zero in on students’ use of a word, concept, discussed in the prompt, after all students have posted. Could be useful in large class/sections, too. 

    There are easier controls for managing notifications, seeing new updates, etc. 

    Students can subscribe to a discussion with ease, be notified on their phone or email of any new updates, and student-created discussions automatically set up these notifications. 

    Instructors can organize discussions into their proper Assignment Groups easily during the discussion creation process.

    Do you ever find that you need an ad hoc discussion in the middle of a semester? Creating a spontaneous discussion and including their posts as part of their overall grade is possible with this feature. 

     

     

    Functionality Maintained in Canvas 

    Instructors will maintain the ability to link to external content (e.g. videos, attachments, etc.) 

    Canvas Discussions, like Blackboard Discussions, don’t live in a vacuum – they are connected to other content you find out on the web, as well as your own instructional content or instructions (such as Panopto videos and Office365 files. 

    Instructors can still require that students post before seeing other students’ posts. 

    Instructors can still ask students to edit, delete, or start their post over again. 

     

     

    Functionality Lost in Canvas 

    A student’s ability to edit and delete their own discussion posts can only be set on a course-wide basis rather than being set per discussion. 

    This may have significant implications for instructors and their courses. While instructors can ask students to edit, delete, and then start a new post, enabling this will allow this behavior to all course discussions. 

    You cannot set a minimum number of required posts before activity shows as needing grading. 

    This may have been important if you used that “flagging feature” in the Blackboard Grade Center as a prompt to grade student work. 

    A student’s ability to attach items to discussion posts can only be set on a course-wide basis rather than being set per discussion. 

    There is no equivalent to Blackboard’s “force moderation of posts.” 

    This means that student posts are posted without any moderation from faculty (Blackboard had the ability to prevent publishing of posts until faculty had reviewed the content…Canvas has no such equivalent feature). 

    Instructors cannot allow anonymous posting in ungraded discussions. 

     

    Summary 

    For instructors ready to dig deeper, there are two helpful resources to get faculty thinking, planning, and integrating discussions into their summer and fall 2021 courses. Canvas publishes an instructor guide on discussions and a student guide. Instructors looking for new ideas for engagement can also peruse the Priming with Canvas course, developed by the Coulter Faculty Commons. 

      

    Source: https://canvas.cornell.edu/courses/1848/pages/differences-from-blackboard#Discussions 

    How does this align to Canvas training materials?

    Canvas logoPriming the Canvas: Module 4 “Active and Interactive Learning” and Module 12.2 “Teaching Online: Communicating with Your Students” 

     


    Additional Resources: 

    Our next article will highlight How to release content conditionally in Canvasvisit Canvas Blog to see all our Canvas articles. 

    OLC Webinar – Keeping Student Engaged in a Transition to Online Learning

    The Online Learning Consortium is offering a webinar on Friday that may be helpful.  Click on the date to register.

    Webinar: Keeping Students Engaged in a Transition to Online Learning

    March 20 | 1:00pm ET

    As educators across the country and at all levels rush to shift their teaching to a virtual environment, their first focus is content and delivery—rightly so. Faculty also need to know how to identify online at-risk student behaviors that, if mitigated, can lead to better course outcomes and satisfaction for faculty and students, alike. This session will help you identify ways to proactively keep your students engaged in an online environment (course) and understand what data you can use to help mitigate attrition.

    Motivating Honors Students

    Dr. April TalentGuest Blogger ~ Dr. April Talent

     

     

     

    Whether you’re teaching an Honors Section of a course, working with an Honors Student one-on-one through an Honors Contract, or just thinking about how to keep your Honors Students motivated in a regular class, studio, or lab, there are a variety of resources available with ideas for faculty on boosting learning outcomes for Honors Students.

    This short article from the University Honors Program at Kansas University describes moving learning outcomes up to the highest level of Bloom’s Taxonomy in which learning goals are aimed at synthesis, evaluation, integration, and creation.  These higher levels of critical thinking are key to inspiring Honors Students in their studies.  They create modes of learning that challenge motivated students in creative ways that go beyond just doing more.

    This paper (access provided through Hunter Library), written by faculty in The Netherlands, looks at instructional factors and how those strategies challenged their high-ability students.  In their conclusions, they affirm that the combination of student autonomy, complexity, and teacher expectations come together to be effective in keeping these students motivated and challenged and ultimately improving outcomes.  These factors further underscore the value of establishing learning outcomes for Honors Students that are at the highest levels of critical thinking in terms of course learning goals.

    The Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt has a useful summary of Bloom’s Taxonomy on their website.  This is a quick resource that summarizes the action verbs that are aligned with the different processes of learning, e.g. planning, producing, generating, checking, critiquing, attributing, organizing, and differentiating, corresponding to critical thinking at the highest levels of Analysis, Evaluation, and Creation.

    References and Resources

    Armstrong, P. (n.d.) Bloom’s taxonomy. Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching. https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/blooms-taxonomy/

    Scager, K., Akkerman, S. F., Pilot, A., & Wubbels, T. (2013). How to persuade honors students to go the extra mile: creating a challenging learning environment. High Ability Studies, 24(2), 115–134. https://doi-org.proxy195.nclive.org/10.1080/13598139.2013.841092

    Teaching honors students. (n.d.). The University of Kansas Honors Program. Retrieved January 23, 2020, from https://honors.ku.edu/teaching-honors-courses

     

     

     

     

    Best Practices in Honors Contracts Discussed by WCU Faculty and Students

    Honors Update

    Thinking about new ways of engaging students in Honors Contract projects this semester?  Listen in on a panel discussion in which faculty members from a variety of different departments and disciplines talk with Honors students about what makes a great honors project.  Students and faculty members share ideas about what works and doesn’t work, and they discuss ideas for projects and directions that motivate students.  The students and faculty also discuss aims, objectives, and expectations for Honors projects in lower level as compared to higher level courses.  Practical aspects of initiating and developing the project are also discussed in terms of best practices.  Faculty and students discuss their ideas of what an ideal honors project looks like and what the key elements and outcomes of that project involve.  The panel wraps up as students and faculty give examples and talk about the mentoring that happens throughout the semester in guiding an honors project to success.

    Watch the video here: https://youtu.be/qoXplYu1x8k

    We hope that you will enjoy this student-faculty conversation and get some good ideas and inspiration as we start the semester.  Many thanks to our student and faculty participants!  Special thanks to Colin Townsend from The Honors College for moderating the panel.

    Amethyst Hall, senior, majoring in Computer Information Systems
    Rylan Paye, junior, majoring in Mechanical Engineering
    Anna Haggy, senior, majoring in Environmental Health and Political Science
    Eli Hatley, senior, majoring in Emergency Medical Care

    Robert Adams, School of Engineering and Technology
    Kelly Tracy, School of Teaching and Learning
    Jeanne Dulworth, Department of Social Work
    Rob Ferguson, Department of History
    Colin Wasamund, Stage and Screen
    Lori Oxford, Department of Modern Languages

    Reminder that Honors Contracts are due no later than the fourth Friday of the semester.  This semester that will be Friday, February 7. Remember to access Honors Contracts in MyWCU. (see image)
    Need help with Honors Contracts? Contact us at honors@wcu.edu or 227-7383.