Canvas Course Analytics and Quiz Statistics

Canvas offers instructors some incredibly powerful tools to view course analytics, individual student analytics and quiz statistics.

The wealth of information provides instructors with a comprehensive view of student engagement as well as insight into areas for improvement and redesign.

Course Analytics using New Analytics

Learning how to use Course Analytics in Canvas is essential to those Instructors primarily using Canvas to teach online. The information provided in New Analytics will guide instructors to better understand overall participation and engagement from their students. With New Anayltics, Canvas also offers the ability to recognize positive and negative trends to make improvements and adjustments to course quality; easily identifying those students who are struggling, problematic items or areas in your course that may need adjustment.

New Analytics provides:

  • Student Analytics using New Analytics

In Canvas the analytics shown for each student can give instructors valuable insight about engagement, activity, and performance. Canvas’ ability to view individual student analytics allows instructors to disemminate

For more detailed information review the Canvas guides for New Analytics and “How to view Course Analytics?”
Where to access New Analytics
New Analytics main screen

     

    Quiz Statistics

    Another feature provided to instrucors using quizzing in Canvas are quiz statistics. The feature is available to instructors when a quiz has been published and at least one submission has been recieved for the quiz. The quiz summary will show all score percentages as well as the quiz average score, high score, low score, standard deviation (how far the values are spread across the entire score range), and average time of quiz completion. Instructors can view and download a CSV file to view a Student Analysis or Item Analysis for each question in the quiz. 

    Available info from Quiz Statistics:

    1. Student/Item Analysis – Instructors caDownload CSV files to view Student Analysis or Item Analysis for each quiz question to count all student attempts in the statistics.
    2. Quiz Item Analysis – Item analysis may not generate results within specific quizzes. For more detailed information about item analysis limitations and calculations please refer to the Quiz Item Analysis PDF for detailed information about Reliability, Difficulty, and Item Discrimination Index.
    3. Question Summary – Instructors can view an entire quiz summary that shows all score percentages. The quiz summary also shows the quiz average score, high score, low score, standard deviation (how far the values are spread across the entire score range), and average time of quiz completion.
    4. Question Summary Chart – The quiz summary chart is interactive; users can focus on a specific segment of the chart by selecting a range with their cursor, such as viewing the number of students who scored between 0 and 50 percent. Scroll down the page to see data for each question in the quiz.
    5. Question Breakdown  – Quiz question shows the total percentage of students who answered the quiz question correctly. Each question includes a breakdown with each question answer choice.
    For more detailed information review the Canvas guide for “Once I publish a quiz, what kinds of quiz statistics are available?”

    To access Quiz Statistics, Click the “Quizzes” link in your Course Navigation menu, then click the title of the quiz you would like to open. On the right sidebar click “Quiz Statistics”. 

    Quiz Statistics Sample

    Listen to how Dr. Viji Sathy and Dr. Kelly Hogan, instructors at UNC – Chapel Hill are using the insight provided by their LMS to redesign courses for inclusion, encouraging student success while reducing achievement gaps. We hope this inspires you to explore the possibilities with our LMS by using New Analytics in Canvas when redesigning your course while applying Universal Design for Learning and inclusion best practices for all student success.

    How does this align to Canvas training materials?

    Canvas logoPriming the Canvas: 7.0 Module Overview: Universal Design for Learning

     


    Additional Resources:

    Visit Canvas Blog to see all our Canvas articles. 

    Rubrics in Canvas

    Rubrics can be used to grade assignments, discussions and quizzes in a course. 

    Rubrics can be used to as an efficient way to evaluate assignments, quizzes and discussions with more effective and valuable individual feedback and expectation for students. 

     

    Why You Should Consider Rubrics

    Rubrics help instructors:

    • Provide students with feedback that is straightforward, focused and central to learning improvement.
    • Reduce time spent on grading; Increase time spent on teaching.
    • Promote student comprehension of assignment instructions and expectations so they can easily discern what to focus on rather than guessing “what the teacher wants to see.”
    • Streamline evaluation of rubric results to make informed adjustments to course content and material based on identified thematic gaps in student learning across a class.
    • Refine consistency in evaluation of student learning throughout an entire class as well as individual students.

    Rubrics help students:

    • Sharpen their efforts on completing assignments and assessments that align with clearly defined expectations.
    • Self and Peer-reflection on their own learning to make informed adjustments and improvements to accomplish learning level and mastery.

     (Adapted from UC Berkely Center for Teaching & Learning – Evaluate Course-Level Learning – Rubrics)

    It is important to note that rubrics used in Blackboard may look different in Canvas depending on the criteria and settings. Review the information provided in the knowledge base article “Do my rubrics in Blackboard migrate to Canvas?” 

    How does this align to Canvas training materials?

    Canvas logoPriming the Canvas: Module 2: “Designing a Canvas Course” & Module 12 “Teaching in the Virtual Classroom”

     


    Additional Resources:

    Our next article will highlight Canvas Implementation Core Integrations visit Canvas Blog to see all our Canvas articles. 

    How to Release Content Conditionally in Canvas

    Would you like to require students to participate in a discussion, view a file, or some other prerequisite before moving forward in your Canvas course? Faculty who enjoyed Blackboard’s adaptive release tool will be pleased with what Canvas offers, as it’s easier to use, and more flexible. 

     You have multiple ways to release content conditionally: 

    • By date and time 
    • By requiring completion of another module, in its entirety 
    • By requiring students view a file, or mark it as done 
    • By requiring students participatin a discussion 
    • By requiring students to submit an assignment 
    • By requiring a performance threshold on a submitted assignment  

    It’s recommended that you build a module or two before configuring the conditional release settings. However, we encourage you texperiment with the tool at any time, as it opens up ideas for how you can design and facilitate your course.   

     

    To Get Started:  

    Go into a Canvas course, navigate to your Modules page, and click the three dots, as shown below, to edit the module. The settings will appear on the page. 

    Kebob menu

     Module Conditional Release Settings: 

    edit module settings popup window

    An Instructure-developed video provides a walk-through on setting up the settings. You’ll need to navigate to the two-minute mark for the demonstration on module settings.

    When you set up prerequisite modules, students must complete a module before moving to the next module.

    For each module, you can only set prerequisite modules that come before a specific module. You may need to reorder modules to create correct prerequisite availability.

    Please note that you cannot prevent a student from accessing an upcoming module unless requirements have also been set for the prior modules. Requirements indicate the order that students are required to complete module items.

    Note: You can only add prerequisites if you have added at least one module.

    How does this align to Canvas training materials?

    Canvas logoPriming the Canvas: Module 6 “Structuring the Course”

     


    Additional Resources: 

    Our next article will highlight Gradebook & Speedgradervisit Canvas Blog to see all our Canvas articles. 

    Discussions in Canvas

    The Canvas’ Discussions Feature – How does it Fare? 

    Of all Blackboard tools, the Blackboard Discussion Board may be the most utilized by instructors and students. Many faculty rely on the discussion board as a central aspect of their teaching and learning strategy, for icebreakers, the deep dive, and debates.  

    As we move towards Canvas, and away from Blackboard, what kinds of differences can we expect? Does Canvas’ discussions function the same? What implications do these differences have for our design and facilitation? 

    This post explores what faculty can and should prepare for, as it relates to this one central aspect of digital teaching. Let’s start with the functionality we can all expect to see. 

     

    Functionality Gained in Canvas 

    With Canvas, instructors can require peer review of discussion posts. 

    Instructors looking to assign students to small groups for student-to-student learning opportunities will appreciate this feature. 

    Instructors can easily view/filter posts within a discussion through a word search. 

    This may be useful if you need to zero in on students’ use of a word, concept, discussed in the prompt, after all students have posted. Could be useful in large class/sections, too. 

    There are easier controls for managing notifications, seeing new updates, etc. 

    Students can subscribe to a discussion with ease, be notified on their phone or email of any new updates, and student-created discussions automatically set up these notifications. 

    Instructors can organize discussions into their proper Assignment Groups easily during the discussion creation process.

    Do you ever find that you need an ad hoc discussion in the middle of a semester? Creating a spontaneous discussion and including their posts as part of their overall grade is possible with this feature. 

     

     

    Functionality Maintained in Canvas 

    Instructors will maintain the ability to link to external content (e.g. videos, attachments, etc.) 

    Canvas Discussions, like Blackboard Discussions, don’t live in a vacuum – they are connected to other content you find out on the web, as well as your own instructional content or instructions (such as Panopto videos and Office365 files. 

    Instructors can still require that students post before seeing other students’ posts. 

    Instructors can still ask students to edit, delete, or start their post over again. 

     

     

    Functionality Lost in Canvas 

    A student’s ability to edit and delete their own discussion posts can only be set on a course-wide basis rather than being set per discussion. 

    This may have significant implications for instructors and their courses. While instructors can ask students to edit, delete, and then start a new post, enabling this will allow this behavior to all course discussions. 

    You cannot set a minimum number of required posts before activity shows as needing grading. 

    This may have been important if you used that “flagging feature” in the Blackboard Grade Center as a prompt to grade student work. 

    A student’s ability to attach items to discussion posts can only be set on a course-wide basis rather than being set per discussion. 

    There is no equivalent to Blackboard’s “force moderation of posts.” 

    This means that student posts are posted without any moderation from faculty (Blackboard had the ability to prevent publishing of posts until faculty had reviewed the content…Canvas has no such equivalent feature). 

    Instructors cannot allow anonymous posting in ungraded discussions. 

     

    Summary 

    For instructors ready to dig deeper, there are two helpful resources to get faculty thinking, planning, and integrating discussions into their summer and fall 2021 courses. Canvas publishes an instructor guide on discussions and a student guide. Instructors looking for new ideas for engagement can also peruse the Priming with Canvas course, developed by the Coulter Faculty Commons. 

      

    Source: https://canvas.cornell.edu/courses/1848/pages/differences-from-blackboard#Discussions 

    How does this align to Canvas training materials?

    Canvas logoPriming the Canvas: Module 4 “Active and Interactive Learning” and Module 12.2 “Teaching Online: Communicating with Your Students” 

     


    Additional Resources: 

    Our next article will highlight How to release content conditionally in Canvasvisit Canvas Blog to see all our Canvas articles. 

    The Syllabus Tool in Canvas

    The syllabus tool in Canvas is powerfully integrated with a course’s Assignments, Grades, and Calendar tools. When you select the Syllabus in the left menu of your Canvas course, the Syllabus tool will display.

    Syllabus tool link in Canvas Course Menu

    The text in the top section [1] can be edited by clicking Edit, then working with the text in the Rich Content Editor (RCE). Below the text area [1] is an auto-generated list [2] of assignment due dates based on due dates set for your assignments, quizzes, discussions, etc. Events will be displayed in a calendar view on the right [3].

    Canvas Course Syllabus, Summary and Events

    Instructors can disable the Summary of assignments and due dates displayed if they choose “Edit” and uncheck the box for “Show Course Summary.”

    Show course summary button

     Note:
    If you are using a course template rather than building your course from scratch, you will see pre-populated information in the content area of the Syllabus. Some of the information on the page is linked to a Course Information Module that already contains academic resources and institutional policies referenced in the WCU Syllabus template document and in what was formally known as the “Academic Toolbox” in Blackboard. There is also supportive guidance in the content area of the syllabus tool  that explains best practice for using the Syllabus tool and chunking out the information to the student from the Syllabus to a module, creating an improved user experience that is easy for students to navigate.

    How does this align to Canvas training materials?

    Canvas logoPriming the Canvas: Module 6 “Structuring the Course”

     


    Additional Resources: 

    Our next article will highlight the Groups in Canvasvisit Canvas Blog to see all our Canvas articles. 

    CFC Open Training Sessions

    In order to practice social distancing and safety precautions, the CFC will be operating by appointment only. No walk-in hours will be available until further notice.

    We are here to partner with you, help answer your questions and find solutions that will work in this rapidly changing environment.

    Join an open session

    Every Tuesday, Thursday & Friday at 11:00am

    Bring all your Blackboard, educational technology, pedagogy and course design questions.

     

    Authenticated WCU Zoom account will be required to join the session.

    Visit zoom.wcu.edu to log in with WCU credentials, click “Join” and enter Meeting ID: 910 6773 8483


    Interested in how to apply online teaching concepts or how to use Blackboard or Panopto?

    Each session provides a space for attendees to ask specific questions about their courses and interact with members of the CFC. Find out about Assessment, Discussion boards, using Collaborate, Zoom or other synchronus tools to interact with your students, as well as how to approach teaching online and flexible face-to-face changes. Review the video Playlist before attending a session.

    Remember the Faculty Resource Hub listed for you in Blackboard is the best place to start.

    Please contact the HelpDesk at 828.227.7487 or submit an IT Help Ticket for immediate course related requests.